Professional Photographers Who Have "Seen the Light"
| Mar 13, 2019

There is a big disconnect between professional photographers and railroad rights-of-way. We’re seeing professional photographers using railroad tracks as backdrops for engagement photos, save the date photos, wedding party group shots, portraits, and all kinds of commercial advertisements. We’re also realizing that many photographers had no idea that they were trespassing on railroad property while taking these photographs. 

In 2018, 520 individuals lost their lives while another 445 were injured while trespassing on railroad tracks. These include people who were taking selfies or other types of photography on the tracks.

Here at the Amtrak Police Department, we have reached out to dozens of these non-compliant photographers who told us they were shocked to find out that they were in fact breaking the law and putting their lives and the lives of their clients at risk every time they took a picture on railroad tracks. I want to share what a couple of these photographers told us in hopes that they will convince others in their profession to “See The Light” and stop shooting pictures on or near train tracks.   

One photographer from Michigan said, “Like many young budding photographers, I was an idiot who didn't acknowledge the dangers of photographing on the tracks.  Embarrassingly, some of my early work with photos on railroad tracks remains online.  I have since removed the post on my personal blog…. professional photographers, like myself should know better."

Another photographer from Colorado said, “That post is not up anymore, and I will never post anything on railroad tracks again. So sorry…. I know how important it is to stay away from railroad tracks!”

In nearly every case, the photographers did not know they must contact the track owners and be granted authorization in writing, to legally take pictures along the railroad right-of-way.  Photographers have the responsibility to encourage safety for their clients by declining requests for shoots on railroad tracks. Please help us get the word out that taking pictures on railroad tracks can at best get you cited by law enforcement, and at worst get you injured or killed. 

 

 

 

 

| Mar 13, 2019

There is a big disconnect between professional photographers and railroad rights-of-way. We’re seeing professional photographers using railroad tracks as backdrops for engagement photos, save the date photos, wedding party group shots, portraits, and all kinds of commercial advertisements. We’re also realizing that many photographers had no idea that they were trespassing on railroad property while taking these photographs. 

In 2018, 520 individuals lost their lives while another 445 were injured while trespassing on railroad tracks. These include people who were taking selfies or other types of photography on the tracks.

Here at the Amtrak Police Department, we have reached out to dozens of these non-compliant photographers who told us they were shocked to find out that they were in fact breaking the law and putting their lives and the lives of their clients at risk every time they took a picture on railroad tracks. I want to share what a couple of these photographers told us in hopes that they will convince others in their profession to “See The Light” and stop shooting pictures on or near train tracks.   

One photographer from Michigan said, “Like many young budding photographers, I was an idiot who didn't acknowledge the dangers of photographing on the tracks.  Embarrassingly, some of my early work with photos on railroad tracks remains online.  I have since removed the post on my personal blog…. professional photographers, like myself should know better."

Another photographer from Colorado said, “That post is not up anymore, and I will never post anything on railroad tracks again. So sorry…. I know how important it is to stay away from railroad tracks!”

In nearly every case, the photographers did not know they must contact the track owners and be granted authorization in writing, to legally take pictures along the railroad right-of-way.  Photographers have the responsibility to encourage safety for their clients by declining requests for shoots on railroad tracks. Please help us get the word out that taking pictures on railroad tracks can at best get you cited by law enforcement, and at worst get you injured or killed.